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Author Topic: Introduction to Men of Steel  (Read 47 times)

SimonHall@TWZ

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Introduction to Men of Steel
« on: October 22, 2019, 11:16:49 AM »
Men of Steel is a 1-1 figures fast moving WW2 skirmish game best played with 20-28mm figures and models.  The rules are fast paced enough to allow a platoon level game in 2 hours and a company level game (120 a side) in 3 hours.  The game is intended to be mainly an infantry game and will be released in a Standard Game and then as an Enhanced Game.

Standard Game: uses the dice from the CCC system, but not the command discs. Players make alternate actions with officers being critical to getting your troops moving well. The Skull Dice are used for Shooting, H-H Combat and morale.  The game has a ready made scenarios for The Bridge at Arnhem with British Paras holding part of the bridgehead against German Panzer Grenadiers.  In addition to infantry heavy weapons, it includes rules for light vehicles armed with machine guns (bren carriers, hanomags, LMG sidecars, Jeeps with HMGs, Buffaloes), and for transports.

Enhanced Game: this adds: a) use of command discs and a greater range of actions to enrich the infantry gameplay, b) off table artillery, c) AFVs, d) aircraft, e) paratroopers, f) amphibious landings.  The AFV system is identical to that used in Divisions of Steel allowing easy transition from the 1-1 game to the battle game.  The difference is simply that you are likely to have at most 1-3 AFVs on table in a Men of Steel game (the rules feature a Hunt the Tiger scenario with one tiger, and a 6dr ATG + Bren Carrier).

I will be testing the rules out in Cape Town using our 28mm skirmish figures, while Mark will be testing in Lancashire in 20mm scale.

Please post your comments below so we can perfect the rules prior to publication in 2020.  The rules are going to be accompanied by four army list books, and a book from Mark Bevis on famous infantry actions of WW2.

Simon Hall & Mark Bevis